How mentoring.design works

Mentoring.design is a platform to connect designers for mentorship. That includes all levels of seniority and backgrounds from graphic design to digital design.

It is a non-profit initiative, and you are not going to be charged. But we do ask you to read the following guidance carefully, so that you know what to expect (and what not). It will help you make your mentorship a success. Good luck!

Anything else you would like to know more about? Don't hesitate to shoot us an e-mail to hello@mentoring.design.

Mentorship is most useful with a specific goal in mind. Here are some examples we have seen work well in the past.

Portfolio review
Your university days are far behind, and so is the freshest case in your portfolio? We know how hard it can be to prep a portfolio when you have been out of the application circuit for some time. An experienced mentor can bring a fresh perspective to your body of work and help you edit and tell the story of your career.

Job hunt
It’s time for a change, but you have no clear direction? Many designers have been at these crossroads. An experienced mentor can support you in deciding which positions are right for you and help you navigate interviews and offers.

Promotion
You are ready to make your case for the next level in your company? Arguing your case can be hard when you are fully engaged in your day job. An experienced mentor can help you formulate your strengths and lend their insights on career progression.


Many mentors also set individual priorities, which you can learn about on their profile pages.

Great mentorship is a lot about about asking the right questions, and less about providing all the answers. It’s more about working together, rather than either one person doing all the work!
Think of it as a relationship. Not as a service.

Learn more in our onboarding guide.

All mentors are listed on our mentor page. We recommend to start by filtering for criteria that are relevant to you, then narrow down by reading through the profile pages of mentors who meet your criteria. Contact the mentor who feels like the best fit.
Please don't mass message many mentors at once.

On every mentor's profile page, there is a link to their LinkedIn profile. Reach out via LinkedIn, letting the mentor know that you are seeking for mentorship via mentoring.design.
Make sure to tailor your message: what do you hope the mentor can support you with?

The mentor accepted your LinkedIn request and shows interest in supporting you? That's great, congratulations!
To give your mentor a better idea of who you are, please introduce yourself. Also expand a bit on what you are seeking support with. Ask for an initial phone call of 30min, so that you can get to know each other, and to learn whether you are a mutual fit.

If you both agree to a mentorship, we recommend filling out the mentorship agreement template with your mentor. This is especially helpful if your challenge is more complex and might require a number of meetings over a longer period of time, like pursueing a promotion. A portfolio review or straight forward advice might be covered by a single meeting or two.
Make sure to also read our onboarding guide.

Usually a mentor will get back to you within a few days. If this is not the case, the mentor might just be very busy or unavailable for other reasons. After a week has passed, feel free to ping the mentor again or reach out to a different mentor.

We are glad you asked!

It's important that you own the relationship, and that includes preparing sessions with your mentor. For more complex challenges that require multiple sessions, we recommend using our mentorship agreement template to align on goals and ground rules with your mentor. For every following meeting, show your progress and bring an agenda or questions. Please also be proactive in following up in-between sessions.
Respect your mentor’s time and attention. Say thank you.

Make sure to also read our onboarding guide.

This is predominantly a Berlin-based community of mentors. Only very few mentors are located outside of Berlin. If in doubt, please check a mentor's LinkedIn page for their location.

If you are based in Berlin, like almost all of our mentors, we recommend to meet in person, especially for the first meeting. It will help you build a personal connection. Now as we find ourselves in the midst of a pandemic, scratch that, until everyone is safe and sound.

If you are based elsewhere, remote is likely your only option anyway ;-)

The mentors keep telling us that they like the idea of giving back to the design community. Supporting other designers to grow is something they enjoy and they feel proud of. On top of that, there is an active community where mentors connect to each other, and this is something they find great value in. All in all, it is a win-win situation for both the mentors and the mentees.

Please understand that all mentors invest their freetime, and you are not being charged. This means they will not always be able to treat this project as their priority, and we ask you to please respect that.

Great to see your interest in becoming a part of mentoring.design. Please first read through a document we prepared for you: Why you should become a mentor. Then simply send us an email to hello@mentoring.design and we are happy to jump on a call with you.